Celebrate NC’s Blueberry Season With These Recipes

— Written By Renee Goodnight and last updated by Lauren Hill
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BlueberriesNC blueberries are in season now and should be available at grocery stores, farmers markets, and roadside stands through July. Did you know our state has over 100 blueberry operations equaling 7000+ acres of blueberries? In 2015, NC was the 7th leading producers of blueberries in the nation. This healthy berry generates close to 70 million dollars for our state’s agriculture economy.

At NC State University’s Plant for Human Health Institute in Kannapolis, Dr. Mary Ann Lila has done extensive research on blueberries. In one study focusing on the anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins in the berry, Dr. Lila stated: “Blueberries can have synergistic benefits that surpass many other fruits when it comes to protection against brain cell death, which in turn may reduce the risk of contracting Parkinson’s.” Learn more about Dr. Lila’s research.

Blueberries are a low glycemic food, meaning they do not raise your blood sugar. Eating a whole cup of nutrient-dense blueberries supports healthy body functions by providing:
Vitamin C
Vitamin E
Vitamin K
Potassium
Calcium
Magnesium
Folate
Fiber

Ever had a savory blueberry pizza? Get the recipe and four others to enjoy. Our growers produce 46 million+ pounds each year so enjoy these beautiful, nutritious, low fat (.5 grams per cup) berries and support your state’s growers and agriculture economy!